Thursday, October 30, 2014

October Virginia Wine Chat

Colonial Virginia Wine Trail

Discover the Colonial Wine Trail! Tonight's Virginia Wine Chat will be the second that focuses on a specific area of Virginia Wine Country. We'll be drinking:
  • Williamsburg Winery 2012 Trianon Cabernet Franc Reserve with winemaker Matthew Mayer (@WilliamsburgTWW);
  • James River Cellars 2013 Gewürztraminer with Mitzy Batterson (@JamesRiverWine);
  • New Kent Winery 2012 Reserve Chardonnay with winemaker Tom Payette (@NewKentWinery); and
  • Saude Creek Vineyards 2013 Traminette (@SaudeCreek)
Join us to learn about them, their vineyards and wineries, and the Colonial Virginia Wine Trail. Follow the #VAWineChat hashtag to join the discussion via Twitter and follow along at the Virginia Wine Chat UStream Channel (http://www.ustream.tv/channel/virginia-wine-chat).

7:30 PM Eastern - JOIN US!

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Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Cauliflower Crust Pizza [Recipe]

Mike suggested that I share some recipes that I've tried on my Primal/Paleo experiment (though at this point it's no longer an experiment, definitely something I will continue). In our house, we LOVE pizza, I would wager it's probably the one meal most requested overall, especially it's so easy to make, order in, or enjoy out. Casual and satisfying.

One of the recipes I've seen for quite a while that intrigued me was cauliflower crust pizza - in the past, I had never really considered it, since I loved bread so much, but cutting out the bread meant no pizza (or cheating). So several weeks ago, I bit the bullet and made the pizza. There are many, many recipes out there, so I distilled several into one I thought would work.

Cauliflower Crust Pizza

Ingredients:
1 cauliflower
kosher salt
dried basil
dried oregano
garlic powder
Parmesan cheese
mozzarella cheese
egg
To make:
  1. Preheat pizza stone or baking sheet in a 450 degree oven.
  2. Place in food processor and process to an equal consistency. 
  3. Transfer to oven-safe or microwave-safe container. Cook or microwave until just tender. 
  4. Let cool and then pour into cheesecloth or clean kitchen towel. Wring it until no more liquid comes out. This will help create a chewier crust.
  5. Mix together all ingredients in a bowl, adjusting for taste and texture. I ended up using extra cheese (1/2 cup of each) and 2 eggs to get it to the desired consistency - it really depends on how much cauliflower you have.
  6. Place mixed ingredients onto oiled parchment paper and shape into even thickness crust, then transfer to preheated pizza stone or baking sheet. Bake until golden brown - times will vary depending on ovens as well as actual ingredients used.
  7. Remove from oven, add toppings, then return to oven to melt cheese and heat toppings.
  8. Enjoy!
Cauliflower Crust Pizza Step by Step

I will say that this turned out better than expected, really an enjoyable alternative to regular bread crust, a necessity if you are Primal or a dairy-eating Paleo person. While this crust is softer and more pliable than typical crusts, it definitely works. It's no more time-consuming than making regular homemade pizza crust.

(This post was originally shared on my fitness blog, Midwest Multisport Life, and was so popular I decided to share it here as well - enjoy!)

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Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Wine and Halloween Candy Pairings?

Wine and Halloween Candy Pairings?

Definitely not my style, but possibly something interesting, though more likely disgusting - this week's WineChat explores pairing wine and Halloween candy. No way I could do that beyond basic dark chocolates, but perhaps someone has come up with an unlikely but tasty combo. Tune in Wednesday night at 9:00 PM ET and follow hashtag #winechat on Twitter.

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Thursday, October 23, 2014

Scarily Good Wines: Casillero del Diablo

Scarily Good Wines: Casillero del Diablo

Casillero del Diablo is perfect for the "Official Wine of Halloween" - stored in hell, made in heaven. We're big fans of their wines, always tasty and not too expensive ($11 SRP for the Reserve Collection, though we usually get it for even less than that). As a daily wine, their varietals are sure to go with the food we pair it with, without fail.

Casillero del Diablo: Wine Legend video

This fall, they are running a Legendary Costume Contest: easy to enter, with a DSLR camera and more as the prizes. Watch the video above, take a costumed photo that best represents the Casillero del Diablo theme, like their Facebook page, and enter. Entries accepted through November 9th, winner announced on December 1st.

Enter now!

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Wednesday, October 22, 2014

In the Cellar: 1985 Volnay

1985 Moillard Clos des Chênes, Volnay Premier Cru

I am flat out horrible about cellaring wine - one, because I can't really afford too much that is worth cellaring and two, I'm too impatient to wait. I do have a few bottles, however, that I've managed not to drink and they sit in the bottom bin of my wine cooler, hopefully happily aging to their full potential. One of the wines is a bottle of 1985 Moillard Clos des Chênes, Volnay Premier Cru I liberated from my father-in-law's basement a few years ago. I actually grabbed two, one of which we tasted about 2 years ago:
"Very dark, deep red color. A violet nose, common for these wines, along with some faint strawberry. Good tannin structure, with more floral and berry flavors in the mouth, with a lingering finish."
Pretty basic tasting notes, but it was definitely holding up well, surprising in that they never did anything special for their wine storage, just stuck it in the basement in the original wooden crates and then pulled them out on occasion.

Not sure when this will be pulled out for consumption, it's always a difficult decision to drink one of my "special" wines, usually reserved for an anniversary or New Year's or the like.

How do you decide when to drink a special wine?

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Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Uncorked Ventures Wine Club

Uncorked Ventures Wine Club

Nothing better than the gift of wine, unless the wine comes with additional items you pick based on the themes of savory and sweet gourmet, chocolate, or the refined and elegant, all packed in a beautiful wooden crate. Brothers-in-law Mark Aselstine and Matt Krause of Uncorked Ventures go treasure-hunting in California, Oregon and Washington wine country to bring you the very best wines that few people have ever heard of. Mark (@WineClubGuy) and I connected on Twitter, and after bantering back and forth for a long time, he sent me a few bottles to try out.

Tasting Notes:
Cinque Insieme ("Five Together") 2011 Dry Creek Valley Grenache: transparent garnet with ruby highlights; shy on the nose: a bit of cassis, earth, herbal notes; cassis, blackberry, red berry and dusty dark plum flavors; luscious mouthfeel, beautiful balance, with a slight tannic finish promising at least a few years of drinking pleasure; 15.24% ABV; cork closure; 300 bottles produced; SRP $24 (no longer available through winery).
VinRoc Wine Caves 2009 Napa Valley Atlas Peak Cabernet Sauvignon: Deep purple-black in color, totally opaque; tar, smoke, licorice and black fruit aromas; black cherry cola, dark fruit, currant, mocha, spice and licorice flavors; luscious mouthfeel with a mineral and spice finish;14.5% ABV; cork closure; SRP $98. This wine is all about muscular character, sense of place, ageability, and in your face power, tons of depth and richness, tannins that are mellow enough for drinking now, but integrated enough to make this a wine that will reward patience in the cellar. With apologies to Queen and a fully intended pun, this wine will Roc you.VinRoc takes its name from the rock strewn mountain vineyard and rock hewn wine cave.
These two wines are great examples of what treasure-hunting will do, when executed with passion. While totally different in feel and price, both are well-made examples of their respective genres. Uncorked Ventures should be a wine club that you are inspired to try out.

These wines were provided for tasting purposes - all opinions are my own.

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Thursday, October 16, 2014

Drink Local Wine Week: Wollersheim Winery

Wollersheim Winery 2013 Prairie Fumé

It's the national Drink Local Wine Week! Sitting as we are at the junction of three states (Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, with Michigan not far), we feel like the local wine scene has quite a bit of variety, though we're not so sure of the quality every time. However, it's still important to support the locals, and this week was a nice reminder to do just that. After plans to visit some local wineries fell through this past weekend for sundry reasons, it was off to the local wine shops to explore their offerings. Unfortunately, slim pickings. I wasn't really in the mood for fruit wine (snobby, I know), nor a holiday-themed flavored wine (Halloween wine anyone?), but happily I spied one bottle of wine from Wisonsin's Wollersheim Winery. I've tried a red from them and was pleasantly surprised, so a white made from a hybrid grape we've enjoyed before from other producers seemed like a safe bet.
"In 1972, Robert and JoAnn Wollersheim purchased the winery farm property from Peter Kehl’s great grandson with the intention of restoring it to a working family winery. The hillside slopes were again planted with vineyards, the underground wine cellars were refurnished with oak barrels, and the main floor of one of the buildings was converted into a store to make Wollersheim wine available for visitors."
Tasting Notes

2013 Prairie Fumé: 100% Seyval Blanc; cold fermented, stopped fermentation to maintain residual sweetness; super light yellow color; white floral, lemon, and subtle green melon aromas; bit of green apple, green melon, and lemon flavors into a honeyed stone fruit finish; nicely balanced, with some acidity to counter the sweetness; 10% ABV; twist-off closure; SRP $15, paid $12 at the local wine store. Inspired by crisp Sauvignon Blancs, this wine made from a hybrid grape that is slightly sweeter than a typical Sauvignon Blanc is a very nice effort, well done.

After some further research, it turns out that the grapes for this wine were grown in New York state, so while the winery is local, the grapes are not. This was not noted on the bottle labels, though "American Seyval Blanc" could have been a clue. A real bummer that Midwest wineries are still doing this.

How did YOU celebrate Drink Local Wine Week?!

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Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Sensational Soave Master Class - Chicago

Sensational Soave Master Class - Chicago

Last week, I was thrilled to be able to attend the Sensational Soave Master Class - Chicago, presented by the Soave Consorzio Tutela and Full Circle Wine Solutions. Helmed by Master Sommelier Evan Goldstein, with color commentary by Giovanni Ponchia of the Soave Consorzio. The educational seminar was held at Nico Osteria, a quite beautiful restaurant in the Gold Coast of Chicago, always a fun and swanky area to visit. This was my first visit to the restaurant and I cam e away impressed by the design, the service and, of course, the food.

The seminar started, after some introductory remarks, with a blind tasting of 10 wines - we were left to our own devices to taste and take notes, before being brought back together as a group for the big reveals. Some of the wines I liked, some not so much, but there was a definite sharing of several characteristics across most of the wines: bright acidity, lemony overtones, as well as plenty of almond smells and flavors. The most shocking thing, perhaps, was that these wines, from current releases to three dating back to 2001, 2005, and 2009 respectively, were all available within a range of $9-29. Very nice QPR for the group as a whole.

Sensational Soave Master Class - Chicago

After a brief break to sip on a Soave Spumante (who knew they made sparklers?!), it was back to the grind and more facts about the area. Soave is delineated by soil types, with the East and Central area siting on volcanic and basaltic soils, and calcareous or limestone soils in the West and South. The average age of the grapevines is 35 years old, brought down only by a few misguided attempts to "freshen" the vineyards (Soave now educates its winegrowers to leave in the ground as long as possible, if they are healthy). Garganega is the principle grape, with a small percentage of Chardonnay and Trebbiano di Soave also represented. Amazingly, Soave is responsible for 4% of all Italian wine production, spread across 13 municipalities and over 16,000 acres.

Sensational Soave Master Class - Chicago

Then, what we had all been waiting for, food and wine pairings! A beet salad was the first course, with a mint component that wowed many of us, bringing out new and tasty components of the wine. A second course of Rigatoni with Mushroom Ragù and Lemon Breadcrumbs showcased yet more flavors and aromas - Soave is classically paired with lemon or other citrus-based dishes, so that was no surprise. The earthiness of the mushrooms went beautifully with the wines, an unexpected pairing that was spot on. For the final course, I got a special plate of hanger steak, as I don't eat fish - I didn't expect much from this pairing, as most white wines would be overshadowed by the meat. No problem for the Soave Superiore, though, much to my amazement. I will say that in most cases, both the food and the wine improved when enjoyed together, compared to eating or drinking on their own. The wines ranged from 12%-13.5%, perfect for the dishes we were served.

This really opened my eyes to both the quality of wines coming from Soave and their incredible food friendliness. These are wines that could be enjoyed as an aperitif, but should, when possible, be allowed to shine when paired with food. And don't be shy about pairing these with just about anything - we had beets (with mint!), mushrooms, and (for me) beef, and the wines handled it all with great aplomb. I wouldn't hesitate to put these on the table at any time, including holidays, when the food gets more varied and perhaps a bit fancier.

This seminar was provided for media purposes - all opinions are my own.

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Tuesday, October 14, 2014

WineChat: Old York Cellars 2013 Vidal Blanc

Old York Cellars 2013 Vidal Blanc

This is Drink Local Wine Week, but last week I was treated to my first New Jersey wine, the 2013 Vidal Blanc from Old York Cellars. While not located in one of New Jersey's three viticultural areas, they are members of the Garden State Wine Growers and Vintage North Jersey. Old York Cellars boasts 25 beautiful acres of preserved farmland and 13 acres of rolling vineyards framing scenic views of the Sourland Mountain range. The vineyard was first planted in 1978 when the farm was known as Amwell Valley Vineyard, which operated as a winery from 1982 to 2005. Old York Cellars opened to the public in 2010. Nothing is wasted at the winery: skins, etc, are ground up and mixed with local manure and put back on the vineyards as compost. Vidal Blanc is a white hybrid grape variety produced from the Vitis vinifera variety Ugni blanc and another hybrid variety, Rayon d'Or and is one of approximately 15 grape varieties used to make wine at Old York Cellars.

Tasting Notes:

Very clear light yellow in color; subtle pear, white peach, and melon aromas; lemon, melon, and subtle apricot flavors; satiny mouthfeel into a tart citrus and acidic finish; 12.1% ABV ; synthetic cork closure; SRP $17.

I definitely preferred this as it warmed, the initial somewhat closed impression gave way to a softer, more expressive expression the closer it got to room temperature. Paired with a cauliflower crust sausage pizza, the wine's acidity was a nice foil for the varied tastes and textures of the pizza.

A truly surprising wine, one that changed my mind about what I expect from NJ wines in the future.

This wine was provided for tasting purposes - all opinions are my own.

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Thursday, October 9, 2014

A Year in Burgundy [Film Review]

'One year with the people who make wine like no-one else in the world'

A Year in Burgundy

I'm not much of a theater-goer, and, for the most part, most wine-related movies (documentaries) are not being shown in the local multiplex anyway. It's great when I get the opportunity then to see a wine documentary at home. This week, over several evenings, I watched "A Year in Burgundy," a film that follows an importer of Burgundian wines, Martine Saunier, her producers, and the grapevines and wineries they oversee.

One year in the life of a winemaker is full of peril and success - the film follows the 2011 vintage, starting in the winter with an extremely early Spring that stretches into hot and dry weather. New vines are planted, but as Burgundy does not allow irrigation (first time I've heard that!), rain is needed and finally received. But rain can be an enemy itself, if it descends as hail, which can lead to widespread devastation or just destroy a single vineyard's crop. It's interesting to see the people who come out for the harvest and the preparations necessary by the winery.

A Year in Burgundy Trailer [video]

Overall this is a pleasant and beautiful movie - the scenery is amazing and the people featured are appealing. To me, however, there is not a coherent storyline and the segues across the year are somewhat abrupt and uneven. This is an editing problem and nothing to do with the content. I think it may have been a better movie if it had followed a single winemaker (or just several), to really focus on a single year without distractions.

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Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Wine and Wings [Infographic]

I'm a sucker for info graphics, which is good and bad. When done well, like Madeline Puckette's over at Wine Folly, infographics give you pertinent information in a condensed fashion, easily read. At their worst, they go on and on interminably, with garish colors, multiple (sometimes illegible) fonts, with way more than you ever wanted to know about absolutely anything. Somewhere in between are the rest, usually not very necessary, but simple and fun. Like this one, from Uproot Wines, on how to pair chicken wings with wine - it's football inspired, so timely, many of us do enjoy chicken wings, but I'm sure you, like me, probably weren't conducting taste tests to see which wines went with which style of wing.

Wine and Wings [Infographic]

There you have it and now, have at it.

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Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Elena Walch Pinot Grigio

Elena Walch Pinot Grigio

It's always fun to try wines from new producers, so I was excited to get samples of two Pinot Grigios from Elena Walch, their typical bottling and also a single vineyard offering. Best known as the "Queen of Gewurtztraminer," she is now considered one of the best producers in the region and is credited with being one of the first to start the quality revolution in Alto Adige. Family-owned and operated, the vineyard is farmed using sustainable practices, with minimal intervention of herbicides and pesticides, with organically grown test plots a possible future course for them.

The Elena Walch Portfolio is divided into five collections:
  • Selezione: Mostly monovarietal wines; from their own vineyards and from leased vineyards.
  • The Favorites: Prime estate blends, exclusively from their own vineyards, excluded Ludwig
  • Single Vineyard Castel Ringberg: Monovarietal wines from the Castel Ringberg estate above Lake Caldaro. The production here concentrates on family owned vineyards, separate ageing of grapes from the individual vineyards and special attention to the terroir characteristics of the wine lots.
  • Single Vineyard Kastelaz: Monovarietal wines from the Kastelaz estate above Tramin village. The production here concentrates on family owned vineyards, separate ageing of grapes from the individual vineyards and special attention to the terroir characteristics of the wine lots.
  • Grande Cuvée: Their great cuvée wines are born from the idea of blending the best, but at the same time very diverse grapes from their own various vineyards. Extreme selection of the grapes and precisely determined harvest times are critical to obtaining the best quality.
"The philosophy of the estate is dedicated to its terroir – the idea that wines must be the individual expression of their soil, climate and cultivation in the vineyard – and that this must be maintained according to principles of sustainability and passed on to the next generation. The firm belief that the quality of wine is created in the vineyard requires uncompromising work, taking into account the individuality of each vineyard. With 55 hectares in cultivation, including the two top vineyards Castel Ringberg in Caldaro und Kastelaz in Tramin."
Elena Walch video

Tasting Notes:
2013 Alto Adige DOC: fermented at 18°C in steel tanks, then aged in steel tanks for several months on its lees; lemon yellow color; citrus, white flower, and herbal notes on the nose; pear, green melon, and citrus flavors; medium mouthfeel, crisp acidity, into a finish full of minerality; 12.5% ABV; twist off closure; SRP $17. Tasted initially with a dinner of roasted chicken and baked crisp sweet potatoes, great pairing - the crispness and acidity of this citrusy Pinot Griogio were both a complement and foil for the food.
Castel Ringberg 2013: grapes grown at 1150' elevation in soil with clay and chalk; 85% fermented in stainless steel (15% of the must ferments in 2nd and 3rd usage French oak barriques); undergoes malolactic fermentation; light straw yellow color; white pear, floral, and spice aromas; green apple, pear, melon, and citrus flavors; creamy mouthfeel, minerality and crisp acidity, and a lingering finish; 13.5% ABV; synthetic cork closure; SRP $23.
Teuwen Communications is a full-service public relations agency in NYC that specializes in marketing and brand strategies for the wine and food industries. Led by Stephanie Teuwen, the agency provides high-energy, client-focused services across multiple platforms such as media and trade relations, event production, website building, social media management as well as creative and visual services.

These wines were provided for tasting purposes - all opinions are my own.

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Thursday, October 2, 2014

VAwinechat Monticello AVA

VAwinechat Monticello AVA

This was the first month I participated in the Virginia Wine Chat, a monthly virtual gathering to discuss the wines, winemakers, wineries and regions of Virginia. September's edition focused on wines from the Monticello AVA and was the first winemaker panel discussion focused on one Virginia wine region. Emily Pelton (winemaker, Veritas Vineyard), Jake Busching (winemaker, Grace Estate Winery), and Matthieu Finot (winemaker, King Family Vineyards) discussed their backgrounds, their vineyards and the Monticello AVA. We tasted one wine from each of their wineries, received as samples from the wineries. Consumers and other interested parties could also purchase the wines from the Virginia Wine Club. The Monticello AVA, established in 1984 is an American Viticultural Area (AVA) located in the central Piedmont region of the Commonwealth of Virginia, the heart of which is Charlottesville, and covers 1,250 square miles over four counties. It is named for Monticello, the historic home of Thomas Jefferson, located near the center of the area.

Tasting Notes:
Veritas 2013 Viognier: 95% Viognier, 5% Petit Manseng; fermented in stainless steel, aged in neutral oak; light yellow color; peach, white floral and light citrus aromas; honeyed stone fruit into a citrusy finish; luscious mouthfeel with a nice acid backbone and lingering finish; 13% ABV; 1100 cases made; twist-off closure; SRP $24. This is Viognier made right. 
King Family 2012 Meritage: 42% Merlot, 27% Cab Franc, 25% Petit Verdot, 6% Malbec; aged 18 months in French oak; transparent medium ruby red; smoky, peppery dark plum aroma; cassis, green pepper, dark plum, spice and dark cherry flavors; medium mouthfeel with balanced acidity; 13.5% ABV; cork closure; SRP $31. I'm not always a fan of Meritage, but this was very well-done. 
Grace Estate 2012 Cabernet Franc: 90% Cab Franc, 10% Petit Verdot; transparent dark ruby red color; smoky prunes and tobacco aromas; tart red cherry, pepper, and bright red fruit flavors; light bodied with lots of acidity and pucker of tannins on the finish; 13% ABV; 303 cases produced; cork closure; SRP $23.
Having lived in Virginia about 8 years ago and tasting wine from the state on occasion, I will confess my surprise at the quality of the wines. Perhaps vines are maturing, winemakers adapting to the region, or proper grapes being cultivated, but the improvement is noticeable and appreciated. This tasting made me feel more comfortable about buying a Virginia wine in the future.

The September Virginia Wine Chat was presented by Drink What You Like, the Virginia Marketing Office, and The Virginia Wine Club. Follow the #VAWineChat hashtag to join the discussion via Twitter when it next returns.

Wines were provided for tasting purposes - all opinions are my own.

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Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Riesling Hour: Finger Lakes 2013 Vintage Rieslings

2013 Finger Lakes Rieslings

I get to taste Finger Lakes Rieslings several times a year, when I'm lucky, so it's very exciting to know that, come next fall, I'll be heading there for the 2015 Wine Bloggers Conference (WBC15). Before that, however, I was lucky to get some samples (via the Finger Lakes Wine Alliance) to participate in the Finger Lakes 2013 Vintage Rieslings Launch, or Riesling Hour. Riesling Hour is the world's largest Finger Lakes Riesling virtual tasting, with over 1000 wine lovers from 14 states joining in for this fun virtual tasting event. Riesling Hour is a virtual event leveraging Facebook, Twitter, and blogs with a few venues hosting tastings (New York City, Clifton Park, Boston, Hudson Valley, Finger Lakes) that are open to the public. Nineteen featured wineries are showcased in the tasting. Check out all the posts on Twitter that used the #FLXRiesling hashtag! The wines I received came from 4 wineries: Dr Konstatin Frank, McGregor Vineyard, Thirsty Owl Wine Company, and Keuka Spring Vineyards - not a dud in the bunch!

Tasting Notes:
Keuka Spring 2013 Humphries Riesling: green apple on the nose; honey, peach, lemon flavors, along with an unexpected subtle nuttiness that I loved; round mouthfeel into an acidic finish; 12% ABV; 360 cases produced; cork closure; SRP $22. 
Thirsty Owl 2013 Riesling: fermented using 2 slow yeasts; golden straw color; starfruit, melon, floral, and citrus aromas; green apple, honeysuckle, melon, grapefruit, and stone fruit flavors; medium bodied, high acidity; 11% ABV; cork closure; SRP $15. 
McGregor Vineyard 2013 Riesling: hand harvested grapes from 35+ year old vines, destemmed, pressed, cold and heat stabilized; floral, melon, subtle lychee, and citrus aromas; honeyed stone fruit, honeysuckle, kiwi, and citrus flavors; round body, good acidity, on the sweeter side (4% RS);  10.5% ABV; 323 cases produced; cork closure; SRP $20. 
Dr Konstantin Frank Dry Riesling 2013: fermented with special German yeasts at low temps in stainless steel; light yellow with green highlights; green apple, honeydew, citrus, and white floral aromas; pear, honeydew, citrus and subtle honey flavors; smooth acids; 12.2% ABV; twist-off closure; SRP $15.
Another vintage, another set of great Rieslings coming out of the Finger Lakes. From what I tasted and gathered during the tasting, the 2013 vintage is one that emphasizes melon, citrus, and white floral aromas and flavors for the most part, along with the crisp acidity the FLX wines were known for. Great on their own, better with food, another vintage form a quality area that you can buy with confidence.

The Finger Lakes Wine Alliance executes an annual program of work exclusive to levy contributors. A levy contributor receives a variety of benefits including website inclusion, wine submission program, exclusive event opportunities, virtual tasting series, and additional Marketing Programs for purchase to build not only their winery's brand, but the Finger Lakes brand. The annual program of work is created to increase the visibility and reputation of the Finger Lakes AVA, its wines and wineries. All programs target key markets, upstate and metro New York state and key audiences, trade and media.

These wines were provided for tasting purposes - all opinions are my own.

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