Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Chateau Tanunda Grand Barossa Wines

Chateau Tanunda Grand Barossa Wines

We've had incredible luck lately, getting some truly fabulous wines to taste. Included in these amazing events were the Grand Barossa wines from Chateau Tanunda, a South Australian winemaker of long-standing. We tasted a Riesling (yes, from Australia!), a Shiraz,  and their Cabernet Sauvignon. Here are my tasting notes from that evening:
Riesling - Flowery citrus on the nose and palate, really round in the mouth, crisp acidic finish.

Cabernet Sauvignon - green pepper on the nose, dark cherries, mild tannins, long smooth finish.

Shiraz - cocoa aroma, dark plum, smooth mouthfeel, lingering finish.
These were really outstanding wines, definitely worth searching out.

(Disclaimer: I was sent this wine for free to review on my blog. I did not pay for the item, receive payment for this review, or agree to give a positive review. Aside from any information gleaned from the company website, the opinions are my own.)

Have a wine you'd like reviewed?
Contact me at Kovas@50StatesOfWine.com!

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Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Christian Senez NV Champagne

Christian Senez NV Champagne

Great choice for Champagne Day! The 100% Pinot Noir Christian Senez NV had a citrusy nose, with green apple on the palate, and mild yeast on lingering finish.

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Monday, October 29, 2012

Meatless Monday: Lentil Mango Salad

Laima originally shared this simple clean delicious lentil salad over at Women's Endurance Gear. It was so good I decided to share it here as well. This is a great treat anytime of the year, as the mango give a tropical lift -- availability of mangos is the only concern.

Meatless Monday: Lentil Mango Salad
Lentil Mango Salad on a bed of Kale

Rinse and inspect

1 cup of dry lentils 

Place lentils in saucepan and add

3 cups of water 

one garlic clove 

Cook to desired softness - (I usually cook lentils about 25 minutes).  Towards end of cooking add salt to taste. Drain, discard garlic clove and set aside to cool.

Black Lentils
Black lentils

Wash and chop some cilantro and some parsley. Finely dice onion. Dice one ripe mango. Combine lentils, onions, chopped herbs and diced mango.

Season with:

one tablespoon of olive oil 

juice of 1 lemon 

1 tablespoon white balsamic vinegar

salt and pepper to taste.

Serve on a bed of massaged kale.  Enjoy!

Recipe from Chef Pandita (modified slightly).


MMAZ Better With Veggies


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Friday, October 26, 2012

Wine Wit: I Love Wine

Wine Wit: I Love Wine

"Everyone's all like
'I love Obama' or
'I love Romney' and
I'm just over here like
'I Love Wine'..."

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Thursday, October 25, 2012

Naked Winery Pinot Gris

Naked Winery Pinot Gris

2011 Naked Winery Pinot Gris - green apples on the nose, also on palate, along with lemongrass, hint of sweetness, good acidity, nice finish.

Disclaimer: This wine was sent to me for review purposes, courtesy of Naked Winery. I was not compensated in any other way for the review, was not obligated to give the wine a positive review, and all opinions are my own.

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Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Finger Lakes Sparkling and Ice Wines

Last week, Laima and I were the happy recipients of 7 Finger Lakes sparkling and ice wines, and participated in a virtual tasting. Though we’ve gotten to try Finger Lakes region wines before, these were our first sparklers and icewines. The flavors and aromas were all over the place and, as we’re noticing about this region’s wines, every wine was wonderfully made, plenty of options to suit any palate. Here are my tasting notes from that night:

Finger Lakes Sparkling and Ice Wines
Sparkling Wines:

@atwaterwine first up - delicate bubbles, green apples on the nose, citrus, yeast on palate. Nice long finish

Blanc de Noir from McGregor Vineyard - really small bubbles, lots of yeast flavor, not much on the nose

@SwedishHillWine #Riesling Cuvee - floral aroma, slightly sweet, appley-flavor, good acidity small bubbles, medium finish

Icewines:

@casalargawinery Vidal Blanc #icewine - much darker than expected, stone fruit + honey on the nose + palate, sweet but balanced,

@LucasWinetalk Vidal Blanc #icewine, golden color, stone fruit + honey on the nose tropical fruit flavor w/honey luscious mouthfeel + finish

@knappwinery Vidal #icewine - straw yellow, butterscotch nose, nice acidity, well balanced, sweetness ratcheted up, long finish

@ssvny #gewurtztraminer #icewine - golden color, honeyed apricots on nose and palate, luxurious finish
Definitely can’t go wrong with any of these wines. We finished them off over the course of the week, sparklers first and then icewines, and none of them was harmed by spending some time in the fridge. You can read all the participants’ tweets by searching #FLXWineVT on Twitter.

Disclaimer: This wine was sent to me for review purposes, courtesy of the participating Finger Lakes wineries. I was not compensated in any other way for the review, was not obligated to give the wine a positive review, and all opinions are my own. Some information in this review was taken from the company website.

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Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Gran Reserva Wines: Serie Riberas

Last week, Laima and I had the great luck to participate in a tasting of Concha y Toro's Gran Reserva Serie Riberas wines.

Concha y Toro Gran Reserva Serie Riberas

Gran Reserva Serie Riberas is a special selection selection of Gran Reserva wines coming from vineyards located close to different river basins. This translates into unique, distinctive fresher wines. The line comprises five red varieties (Cabernet Sauvignon, Carmenere, Syrah, Merlot and Malbec) and two whites (Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc).

Here are my notes from the virtual tasting:
2011 Sauvignon Blanc - very light in color, grassy nose and palate, crisp finish

2011 Malbec - incredibly dark, bit of cacao on nose and palate, dry, somewhat abrupt finish

2010 Carmenere - a deep dark wine, more acidic than the Malbec, peppery nose, a hint of sweetness in the finish

2010 Cabernet Sauvignon - wet leather on the nose, dark cherry and earthiness on the palate, smooth finish
These wines have a true sense of terroir, tasting of the earth and climate from where they came. I was amazed at how dark the reds were, almost opaque, though there was color variation within the inky darkness, from red to deep dark purple.

These wines give the impression of luxury and elegance, tasting far beyond their roughly $15 price. The heavy bottles, simple and classy labels, and heavy foil wrappers all add to the sense that these are serious wines.

The tasting was last Wednesday, with the bottles on the counter (Sauvignon Blanc in the fridge) through Sunday. As the days passed, we kept trying the wines and each day, they just got better and better. Any rough edges were polished by time, and the complexity of the aroma and palate deepened, increasing the pleasure of drinking these fine wines. We definitely plan on cellaring the reds as long as we can keep our hands off of them. I can see these being absolutely perfect in 5-7 years, maybe even 10.

Highly recommended.

Disclaimer: This wine was sent to me for review purposes, courtesy of Concha y Toro's Gran Reserva Wines, via TasteLive. I was not compensated in any other way for the review, was not obligated to give the wine a positive review, and all opinions are my own. Some information in this review was taken from the company website.

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Monday, October 22, 2012

Meatless Monday: Fake Meats

Fake Meats logo

People stop eating meat and animal products for many reasons, some for health, others for environmental concerns, others for animal welfare. For many people, giving up meat might mean giving up a favorite childhood dish or comfort meal. Better than giving in to eating the meat-based dish, sometimes a meat substitute, or fake meat, is a better option. But where to turn to? Not all of us live near a grocery store that caters to meat-free diets. Turn to the web—specifically, to FakeMeats.com.

Steven and Kim are the owners of Fake Meats, LLC. Steven is vegetarian and Kim is vegan. Fake Meats is more than an online store, a lifestyle based on trying new foods, products, and recipes, and sharing them with friends - vegans, vegetarians, and omnivores alike.

FakeMeats.com started as a collection of favorite “fake meat” products and the company has grown from there! This website is a one-stop shop for a lot of Fake Meats. New products are added regularly to build a comprehensive product line, offering the largest selection of Fake Meats on the web.

More information can be found on the Fake Meats website, on Facebook, and Twitter.

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Thursday, October 18, 2012

Bombay Spice Restaurant, Chicago

After our amazing food and wine pairing experience at Roka Akor, we were excited to try Bombay Spice, next door and same ownership, but worlds away in terms of cuisine. Bombay Spice is known for their healthy update of typical Indian cuisine, and matching wines to the variety of spices would be no easy task.

Bombay Spice Chicago Collage

First off, the restaurant is such an incredibly cheerful space to walk into, with a front wall of glass that beckons you inside (and can be opened in fair weather, as it was the evening we visited). A mix of appealing bright colors, dark wood, and subtle Indian design touches keep your eye moving around, including looking into the open kitchen or awed at the fully-stocked bar. Bombay Spice shares restrooms with neighbor Roka Akor, which is a little strange, but not a huge deal.

The chef prides himself on exploring healthier options to some traditional dishes, using olive oil instead of butter or ghee, for example. No heavy cream is added, and most of the dishes are vegetarian or vegan, a welcome touch. The chef explained to us that this sort of cooking is actually more traditional, more homestyle, as opposed to the more heavy versions often found in restaurants.

Bombay Spice Chicago Food Collage

Course 1: Papadum with Sauces, Naan, and House Salad with Quinoa, paired with a Frenzy Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand. The Papadum are crispy crackers made of flour, ground lentils, and spices, with 4 spices to try: tamarind, raita, mint, and vindaloo, all unique and fun to taste. We appreciated the naan and used it both to dip and as a sort of palate cleanser over the next few courses. The house salad is an unusual combination of quinoa, chickpeas, cucumbers, tomatoes, onions and salad greens tossed in citrus juices – a tough pairing for wine, but the Sauvignon Blanc took it in stride, tasty with all three dishes. Pretty typically for a New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc, there were plenty of both grassy and citrus notes, which were perfect for these three appetizers.

Course 2: Seared Tofu, chef’s replacement for the typical cottage cheese cubes and an amazing dish, probably my favorite of the night. Paired with a Domaine du Vieux Chene rosé from the Cotes du Rhone, this was a combination to remember. The rosé had a touch of sweetness and high acidity that both complemented the spice dusting and cut through the tamarind dipping sauce served alongside. Inspired food and wine pairing!

Course 3: Vegetable Biryani. The classic basmati rice dish, with fresh vegetables, raisins, almonds, and spices, this was a great example of a healthier version of an already pretty healthy dish. The vegetables were crispy and varied, and the rice cooked just right, not overdone at all. The Heinz Eifel Shine Riesling cut through the spiciness of the dish, offering a sweetness and fatness that worked just right with this dish. Another superb food and wine pairing!

Course 4: Dessert Flight: Rice Pudding, Carrot Halwa, and Mango Sorbet, served with a Funf Moscato from Germany (yes, Germany!). A brilliant wine choice, it was sweet and acidic enough to stand up to three very different desserts: warm carrots, cool rice pudding, and sorbet. Definitely order this combination, the temps and textures keep evolving, almost dancing with the wine – I was just sorry I had to share!

We had an amazing experience, elated both by the cleaner tasting Indian food and by the masterful pairing job with the wines. Not a single misstep and plenty of opportunities to do so, the wines complemented the dishes, played off of them, and were good on their own. One thing I noticed is that I felt like I had just eaten a good meal, but was not overstuffed, as is sometimes the case after Indian food -- definitely a benefit of the cuisine re-do. Service was professional and friendly, with dishes explained and questions answered. Both in Bombay Spice and neighbor Roka Akor, we noticed a friendliness, lack of ego, and a clear pride in doing a professional job. Nice option for lunch, dinner, take-out, or delivery. (I wonder how much it would cost to get it to our home in Downers Grove?)

Please visit the Bombay Spice website,  like on Facebook,  and follow on Twitter.

Bombay Spice on Urbanspoon


Disclaimer: This wine tasting meal was comped for me for review purposes, courtesy of Bombay Spice. I was not compensated in any other way for the review, was not obligated to give the restaurant a positive review, and all opinions are my own. Some information in this review was taken from the company website.

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Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Ca’ Momi Winery's Ca’ Rosa Frizzante

Ca’ Momi Winery's Ca’ Rosa Frizzante

I love sparkling wines and I love rosés, so this offering from Ca' Momi Winery promised to be a special treat.  The bottle label, kind of homespun, is an inauspicious start, but it's what's inside that counts, right? From the start, this rosé is a surprise, with a tropical crispness to the nose that is quite unexpected. There is definitely a touch of sweetness on the palate, though much less than we awaited, with berry and more tropical fruit underpinning a lively acidity and effervescent charm. Outstanding by itself, it also paired well with food, making this a good option to start a meal and then continue through the first course. Really a wonderful surprise!

Disclaimer: This wine was sent to me for review purposes, courtesy of Ca' Momi Wines. I was not compensated in any other way for the review, was not obligated to give the wine a positive review, and all opinions are my own. Some information in this review was taken from the company website.

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Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Tuesday Tasting: Naked Winery Viognier

Naked Winery Viognier

Our first Naked Winery wine, their Viognier "Complicated." Off-dry, with tropical fruit on the nose and palate, medium finish. We drank it with a quinoa, chickpea, feta, spinach and Goddess Dressing wrap, really a good combo. Not complicated at all, just good.

Disclaimer: This wine was sent to me for review purposes, courtesy of Naked Winery. I was not compensated in any other way for the review, was not obligated to give the wine a positive review, and all opinions are my own. Some information in this review was taken from the company website.

Would you like your wine reviewed?
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Monday, October 15, 2012

Thursday, October 11, 2012

The Homebuilt Winery Book Review


The Homebuilt Winery book cover

It’s no secret that most of us, if we could, would be living a pastoral life amongst the vines, enjoying the rural quiet, vinifying to our heart’s content. The fact is that most of us probably live in a suburb or a major metropolitan area, so any winemaking is generally done via fantasy. But, even though we may not have the acreage or facilities to open our dream winery, there is still the opportunity to become a garagiste, like Steve Hughes, author of The Homebuilt Winery: 43 Projects for Building and Using Winemaking Equipment (North Adams, MA: Storey Publishing, 2012).

Hughes has written a book that purports to prepare you to set up a home winery and build all of the basic equipment for just a fraction of the cost of store-bought. Included in the book are building plans and step-by-step instructions. Hughes also leads readers through the entire process of winemaking--how to use the equipment, how to set up a winery, the best ways to store and analyze wine, and the best ways to filter, bottle, cork, and label.The most amazing thing about this book is that it actually makes me believe I could do it, building my own destemmer, press, and other needed winemaking equipment on my own. Pretty much all of the material can be found at your local hardware store, and the tools are pretty basic as well.

The Homebuilt Winery page examples

If you’re an armchair winemaker or actually thinking of starting a winery at home, this is a must-have for your library. Fun to read through and dream of what could be, but also incredibly practical as it can make those dreams a reality.

About the Author: Steve Hughes is a home winemaker who also has over 40 years of experience as a building designer and contractor. He regularly contributes articles on building winemaking equipment to WineMaker magazine.

Stephen Hughes

More information can be found on the Homebuilt Winery Facebook page.

Disclaimer: This book was sent to me for review purposes, courtesy of the Storey Publishing. I was not compensated in any other way for the review, was not obligated to give the book a positive review, and all opinions are my own. Some information in this review was taken from the company website.

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Tuesday, October 9, 2012

XOCO Restaurant, Chicago, IL

(Photo taken from the website http://www.rickbayless.com/restaurants/xoco.html)

Xoco is…hold your breath…a fast food place. I know, I know, I was kind of shocked. All of Chicago and apparently much of the foodie world were all aTwitter in September 2009 over the opening of Rick and Deann Bayless’ new street food joint. I was a little surprised to walk into a Chipotle. Hey, it’s nice, but it doesn’t give off the vibe of authenticity I was expecting. Looks clean, decent art, open food prep area, don’t get me wrong, this is not your typical Jack-in-the-Box, but it doesn’t look all that different from any other chain (perhaps that’s the plan?).

Now, the food – according to the Baylesses, XOCO (meaning “Little Sister” to Frontera and Topolobampo) “proffers contemporary expressions of Mexico’s most beloved street food and snacks: hot-from-the-fryer churros and flaky empanadas; frothy Mexican hot chocolate (ground from Mexican cacao beans right in our front window!); warm, crusty tortas (Mexican submarine sandwiches); and made-to-order caldos (meal-in-a-bowl soups) that feature everything from roasted vegetables to seafood to pork belly.” Shooting high, promising the world, but does it deliver? First of all, I can’t imagine getting the Woodland Mushroom Torta (Wood-roasted garlic mushrooms, Prairie Fruits Farm goat cheese, black beans, wild arugula, 3-chile salsa) on the street in Mexico, anywhere. Is it good? Absolutely! Pricey? Somewhat. “Big, bold Mexican marketplace flavors?” Not so much. I’d prefer it much spicier or with stronger flavors at least. You tell me garlic mushrooms? Let me taste that garlic! My buddy had the XOCO Salad (wood-grilled chicken, marinated black beans, arugula, romaine, crispy tortilla threads, avocado-lime dressing), which he enjoyed, but thought it lacked tomatoes. I had the above-mentioned torta and also a Bean-To-Cup Chocolate (fresh-roasted cacao beans ground on premises), the Almendrado: chocolate shot + almond milk – that was really good.

Here’s the test: Would I go back? Yes. While not inexpensive, and definitely not street food in vibe or preparation, the meal was simple, quickly made, and tasted fresh and healthy, which is definitely not fast food.

More from the web: XOCO or Twitter.

Have you eaten at this restaurant? Leave a comment and let everyone know how you liked it. Or leave me a comment on whether this was a useful review.

Xoco on Urbanspoon


This post originally appeared May 11, 2010, on Midwest Multisport Life.

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Monday, October 8, 2012

Meatless Monday: "Chicken" Fajitas

"Chicken" Fajitas Collage

Ingredients:

2 cups Butler Soy Curls (approximately ½ bag)
1 packet Mexican Seasoning
Salt and Pepper to taste
1 large yellow onion, cut into ¼” wide slices (about 2 cups)
2 bell peppers (various colors), cut into ¼” wide slices (about 2 cups)
3 tbsp. olive oil
1/2+ cup water

Directions:

In a medium bowl, reconstitute Butler Soy Curls by covering them in warm water and letting them sit for 10 minutes. Drain the Soy Curls and press them lightly to remove excess water. Heat 1 tbsp. oil in a large, high-sided, non-stick skillet on medium eat. Season the Soy Curls with salt and pepper and sauté the Soy Curls, stirring occasionally, until a golden brown crust begins to form. Remove the sautéed Soy Curls and set aside. Heat 2 tbsp. oil in the same pan on medium heat. Add the peppers and onion and sauté, stirring occasionally, until the onions begin to turn translucent. Add the seasoning packet, cooked Soy Curls, and ½ cup water to the pan and mix well. Turn the heat down to medium/low and continue to simmer, stirring occasionally, until all ingredients are heated through and the peppers reach the desired tenderness. Add more water if the pan becomes too dry.

This recipe uses Soy Curls as the "chicken" substitute. Soy Curls are made from the whole soy bean, take on the flavor of your recipe, and get a pull-apart texture when sauteed (similar to chicken); this makes Butler Soy Curls a great meat substitute in a multitude of recipes. We received the soy curls and the seasoning packet in our first Fake Meats Meal Pack. (We are in a test group for the program, and the Fake Meats Meal Pack subscription program will be officially launched in Jnuary, 2013.)

We served these on corn tortillas, but they ended up being too crumbly, so most of us switched to flour tortillas, which worked a lot better. Laima ate the filling on its own and enjoyed it that way as well. Mexican rice was a nice side dish that is recommended to fill out the meal. All four of us really enjoyed this dish – we’re looking forward to trying out more of our Fake Meats meals!

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Friday, October 5, 2012

La Crema Winery's Harvest Live

La Crema Winery Harvest Live App

If you're like me and dream of visiting far-flung wine destinations, but are short on the cash necessary to do so, sometimes the best alternative is to surf the web. La Crema Winery has created a fun way to do so, via their Harvest Live app on Facebook. This is a site that that offers videos, photos, Twitter feed, and even an online scavenger hunt! It's a pretty neat amalgamation of their other social media, including Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram.

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Thursday, October 4, 2012

Zocalo Restaurant and Tequila Bar

Zocalo Restaurant and Tequila Bar prides itself on updating the traditional flavors of Mexico. Adding to the wide-ranging menu of food and dessert are over 130 tequilas and mezcal, while the wine list, surprisingly and happily, lists not a single wine from the U.S.A., making it more likely you'll be drinking something you haven't tried before! The only bummer is the list has no Mexican wines, an unfortunate oversight. I was also pleasantly surprised that Zocalo has a "Plato Vegeteriano" listed as a regular option.

Zocalo Chicago Collage

Zocalo Chicago is located in the River North area of Chicago, within a few blocks of a beautiful park on the Chicago River. Earn your dinner by taking a walk to the park and around this humanly-scaled neighborhood, then opt to sit inside or out for good food and drinks.

The restaurant is beautifully designed, with both homey and industrial touches throughout. The decorations range from empty bottles arranged in rows to milagros to folk art paintings in the Mexican idiom, with dark wood furniture and blankets for curtains. Though a bit dark, it has a very relaxing and comfortable vibe for relaxing throughout the meal.

Zocalo Chicago Food Collage

Course 1: I started with the Casteller Cava (Spain), while Laima opted to try the organic margarita, both excellent choices. The Trio de Guacamole came first: a typical guac, a spicier version, and a fruity option were paired with corn, malanga, and plantain chips, each one complementing a particular guacamole.

Course 2: First up, Empanadas con Plátanos Fritos, a most unusual turnover which we've never tried before. Plantain dough was the unique aspect, with a tasty filling of black beans, cheese and fried plantains. I would have liked to see one more textural component to the dish, either crunchy or chewy, but good nonetheless. I continued my wine exploration with a Mapema Sauvignon Blanc (Argentina), tasty and tart, like many I've tried from South America. The Ensalada con Queso de Cabra is a salad well-worth ordering, with myriad textures and flavors.

Course 3: Along with her Tacos en Cazuela (choice of 3 tacos: Barbacoa, Cochinita Pibil, Tinga de Pollo, or Carne Adobaba), Laima ordered the Araucano Pinot Noir (Chile). I opted for the Plato Vegeteriano, that night a stacked pair of tostadas made up up of roasted veggies, chihuahua cheese, black beans and more, pairing it with the Tomero Cabernet Sauvignon (Argentina). The Pinot was a perfect match for my vegetarian plate, and also complemented Laima's trio of tacos, a versatile wine. Equally tasty was the Cabernet, which we both agreed also stood on its own, not just with the food.

Course 4: Dessert was the Mexican Dessert Platter, a choice of three desserts from their menu. We ordered the Crepas de Cajeta (caramelized apple crepes), Pastel de Chocolate (flourless chocolate cake), and Churros y Champurado. Our server, who until that moment had performed flawlessly, accidentally brought the Pay de Queso (upside-down cheesecake) instead of the Pastel. When we informed him of the mistake, he immediately brought the Pastel for us to try. To our benefit, the Pay de Queso was one of our favorites -- while tasty, the Crepas were missing a textural component that would have elevated it above simply good.

Zocalo Chicago is worth the visit, be it for a casual outing with friends (Tuesday was half-price tequila night), a romantic dinner for two (as in our case), or a place to bring a large group. The restaurant is laid out to accomodate all of the above, along with a generous seating area in the bar. Recommended!

For information, check out the Zocalo Chicago website, follow on Twitter, and like on Facebook.

Zocalo on Urbanspoon


Disclaimer: This meal was comped for me for review purposes, courtesy of Zocalo Restaurant. I was not compensated in any other way for the review, was not obligated to give the restaurant a positive review, and all opinions are my own. Some information in this review was taken from the company website.

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Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Tuesday Tasting: 2011 Finger Lakes Rieslings


2011 Finger Lakes Rieslings

Last  week, we got to enjoy 8 Finger Lakes Rieslings from the new 2011 vintage. The wines were tasted virtually with a group of bloggers, journalists, and representatives from the wineries. Served in two flights, the wines nominally moved from drier to sweeter, with an amazing array of flavors, aromas, and characteristics.

Flight 1 consisted of selections from Ravines Wine Cellars,  Dr. Konstantin Frank Wine Cellars, Lucas Vineyards, and Sheldrake Point Winery.

Flight 2 served up Fox Run Vineyards, Swedish Hill Winery, Lakewood Vineyards, and Knapp Winery.

Most striking overall characteristic to us was the pronounced citrus qualities of so many of the wines, fresh and crisp and very refreshing. Beautiful acidity balanced the luscious mouthfeel, with long finishes creating pleasure on their own, but especially with food. Very little petrol essence in this group of 8, rather fruit forward, with stone fruit, tropical fruit, and more citrus underlaid with definite mineral components.

Not a dud among this group, and, as is typical of Riesling, the wide range of styles means that everyone could find something to like. We found we liked them all!

These wines were sent to us to sample, courtesy of the Finger Lakes wineries listed. No compensation was received and a positive review was not guaranteed. All opinions are my own.

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Monday, October 1, 2012

Meatless Monday: Vegan Chocolate Chip Scones

Meatless Monday: Vegan Chocolate Chip Scones

Nothing like a special breakfast on the weekend, and one of our kids’ favorites are chocolate chip scones. I’ve been using the recipe from “Joy of Cooking” for many years, with some modifications, and adapting it for a vegan option is simple, just substituting flax meal and water in place of the egg.

Basic scones: In a larger bowl, mix 2 C all-purpose flour, 1/3 C sugar, 1 Tbsp baking powder, and 1/3 tsp salt. Then mix in 6 Tbsp oil, to create a crumby mixture. In another bowl, mix 1 Tbsp flax meal , 2 Tbsp water and ½ C soymilk. Blend the wet into the dry and that’s it for basic scones.

For additional ingredients, we also added some dry oats, dried bananas, walnuts, vanilla, and chocolate chips.

Preheat oven to 425, place individual scones on baking sheet, and bake approximately 15 minutes until browned to your preference.

Dig in – yummy!

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